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Biografie

Valerio Sannicandro

Valerio Sannicandro

Valerio Sannicandro, composer, conductor and researcher (b. 1971 in Italy) studied in Germany (York Höller, Hans Zender, Peter Eötvös) and France (Emmanuel Nunes) and obtained a PhD in musicology in Berlin (Technical University). His musical output ranges from solo works to large orchestral works, also with voices, and music theater with extensive use of live electronics. His recent projects include Spells and Finesterrae with the Neue Vocalsolisten, Garth Knox and the SWR Experimental Studio, Ius Lucis (2006/2007), for two ensembles in two music halls commissioned by the Centre Pompidou-Paris), Forces Motrices for orchestra and live electronics, and A Book of Waves for GRM (Radio France, Paris).
Valerio Sannicandro was Affiliated Fellow (AAR 2013), Artist-in-Residence at Villa Kujoyama (Kyoto, Japan) and received several prizes (Claudio Abbado Composition Prize of the Academy of the Berlin Philharmonic, Musica Viva Munich 2002 and 2010, Kranichsteiner Music Prize 2000). In 2020 he started a composition mentoring program for young composer:s. His works are published by Edizioni Suvini-Zerboni (Milan).

 

It is hardly possible to put this into wordsbut without hesitation I can say that the origins of my music are deeply connected to the idea of space. Beyond any phenomenological or purely intuitive meanings, space and spatiality represent musical aspects that I have been exploring since at least 2003, and whose powerful poetry continues to exert a strong influence on my musical thinking. My curiosity about the close interaction between acoustic instruments and live electronics brought me to some of the most interesting institutions in Europe (IRCAM, SWR Experimentalstudio Freiburg, ZKM Karlsruhe, GRM Paris, ICST Zurich). I met dedicated people there, with whose help I was able to gain valuable experiences for which I will always be grateful. Because later I transferred many achievements from the practice of electronic music into my own musical vocabulary. I have conceived works for various spaces along the way, instrumental and vocal works based on specific space-related musical figures.
Valerio Sannicandro

Werkinformation

Kathrin Denner: caderefallen

Kathrin Denner: caderefallen

The verb cadere comes from Latin and can be translated as to fall, sink, fall down, perish, flow down, pour out, spill, fall, die, slaughter, sacrifice, succumb, hit, fall away, befall, and end.

The term cadence is derived from the Latin cadere. In addition to the falling away of the voice in linguistics and the metrical form of a verse ending, a cadence also refers to a chord sequence as the conclusion or structure of a piece of music; for this purpose, the step or function theory is usually used, i.e., methods of description of the 19th and early 20th centuries. The reduction to the sequence of chords is thus problematic, since the development of the cadence goes back to counterpointthe art of contrapuntal voice leading, about 400 years earlier. In addition, a cadenza is also an improvised or written-out soloistic embellishment of a theme at the end (of individual movements) of a concerto, which gives the musician the opportunity to show off his or her virtuoso skills.

In my piece caderefallen, I refer to the theme of cadenza most likely from a contrapuntal perspective. Small, clause-like ornaments play around central notes, which fall steadily. In the truest sense of the word, it becomes deeper and deeper. Cadence in my free interpretation, falling and falling and falling has a hidden reference to baroque figure and cadence theory. Of course, the »solo cadenza«, improvised according to instructions, must not be missing shortly before the end. This is performed not by one, but by four musicians.
Kathrin A. Denner

Biografie

Kathrin Denner

Kathrin Denner

In addition to trumpet and music theory, Kathrin A. Denner (*1986) studied composition with Theo Brandmüller, Wolfgang Rihm and Johannes Schöllhorn at the music academies of Saarbrücken, Karlsruhe and Freiburg. She has won prizes at numerous competitions, including the

German Music Competition (German Music Council, 2013). In 2018, she was awarded the German Music Authors’ Prize of the GEMA and received a highly endowed cultural scholarship from the city of Karlsruhe. She has long been supported by the Oskar and Vera Ritter Foundation, and is also a recipient of the Landesgraduiertenstipendium of the state of Baden-Württemberg. Currently she is Composer in Residence of the Junge Oper in Dortmund and Scholarship Holder and Composer in Residence of the Herrenhaus Edenkoben.

She advocates for the interests of fellow composers as a board member and on the leadership team of the E-Music section of the German Composers’ Association and as a delegate of the extraordinary members of GEMA. She is a passionate lecturer at the music academies in Trossingen and Karlsruhe, among others.

Her catalog of works includes solo works, chamber music, ensemble pieces, works for choir and orchestra, and computer music.

Biografie

Anna-Maria Hefele

Anna-Maria Hefele

Anna-Maria Hefelegraduate of the renowned Mozarteum Salzburg (Master of Arts)is a multi-instrumentalist, singer and overtone singer and performs as a soloist worldwide with various ensembles, orchestras and choirs. She also performs widely in contemporary dance, circus and dance theater productions. In an effort to re-establish Western overtone singing in contemporary music, Anna-Maria collaborates with composers who write for this particular vocal technique. By filtering and amplifying the partials contained in the human voice, it is made to appear as if a person is singing two notes at once. Their viral YouTube video »polyphonic overtone singing,« now with over 19 million views, has been followed by many TV and radio appearances. »A voice like not of this world«, »The woman with two voices«, »Polyphonic vocalist achieves the impossible«this and similar were the headlines about the exceptional musician.
www.anna-maria-hefele.com

Biografie

Anna-Maria Hefele

Anna-Maria Hefele

Anna-Maria Hefelegraduate of the renowned Mozarteum Salzburg (Master of Arts)is a multi-instrumentalist, singer and overtone singer and performs as a soloist worldwide with various ensembles, orchestras and choirs. She also performs widely in contemporary dance, circus and dance theater productions. In an effort to re-establish Western overtone singing in contemporary music, Anna-Maria collaborates with composers who write for this particular vocal technique. By filtering and amplifying the partials contained in the human voice, it is made to appear as if a person is singing two notes at once. Their viral YouTube video »polyphonic overtone singing,« now with over 19 million views, has been followed by many TV and radio appearances. »A voice like not of this world«, »The woman with two voices«, »Polyphonic vocalist achieves the impossible«this and similar were the headlines about the exceptional musician.
www.anna-maria-hefele.com

Werkinformation

Giacinto Scelsi: Manto IIII

Giacinto Scelsi: Manto IIII

For several years Giacinto Scelsi wrote mainly solo works for individual instruments, to each of which he devoted himself all the more intensively. In »Manto«, composed in 1957, scordatura (i.e. the altered tuning of the strings) is used in addition to traditional viola playing, and in the third movement the voice of the violist.

Manto was one of the sybils from Delphi, the oracle of the temple dedicated to Appollon. In Greek mythology, she fell into a trance due to the sulfur vapors rising from the earth near the temple. Her oracular sayings return in Scelsi in enigmatic sounds sung by the »Manto« soloist to the viola.

Werkinformation

Annette Schmucki: taumeln

Annette Schmucki: taumeln

language as music
i work with units of meaning and sound. with set pieces of language, language hinges. with words, syllables, sounds, with their similarities and differences.

i work with vertical, horizontal, spatial, temporal and imagined maps of overtone windows, sound shifts, phonetic translations, sound productions in the mouth-voice space.

i am in search of the self-consciousness of language, language that unscrupulously points to itself, but without losing its poetry or in order to become poetry in the first place; poetry as revealed, degyped, constructed, as rhythm and sound. language as naked lyric. as music.

at the same time, language as music also offers me the always shimmering conceptuality of the words, and precisely because i pay little attention to the conceptuality when composing, it pervades the music enigmatically and independently and always anew, gives it fleeting additional color, form, movement, playing instructions, opens and closes fields of meaning, blurs. as if there were an animal lying there, dreaming, chewing its cud, breathing heavily. how can it be possible for this animal to eat itself without waking up, so that in the end only the dreaming, the chewing, the breathing remain.

 

taumeln
the four trombonists play along a list of words that tries to capture the concept of ‘tumbling’, to tame it. by translating the list in different ways, by transferring it into music, the instrumentalists get into different landscapes of heterophony, of swaying and tumbling, of snowstorm, of unison.
Annette Schmucki

Biografie

Annette Schmucki

Annette Schmucki

Annette Schmucki (*1968, Zurich) works with language as music. She studied composition with Cornelius Schwehr and Mathias Spahlinger, received numerous prizes and scholarships. is currently working with durations and encounters of projected words (silent music), with the experimental translation of telephone conversations, with overhead lines and pop songs.
www.blablabor.ch/indexschmucki/

 

language as music
i work with units of meaning and sound. with set pieces of language, language hinges. with words, syllables, sounds, with their similarities and differences.

i work with vertical, horizontal, spatial, temporal and imagined maps of overtone windows, sound shifts, phonetic translations, sound productions in the mouth-voice space.

i am in search of the self-consciousness of language, language that unscrupulously points to itself, but without losing its poetry or in order to become poetry in the first place; poetry as revealed, degyped, constructed, as rhythm and sound. language as naked lyric. as music.

at the same time, language as music also offers me the always shimmering conceptuality of the words, and precisely because i pay little attention to the conceptuality when composing, it pervades the music enigmatically and independently and always anew, gives it fleeting additional color, form, movement, playing instructions, opens and closes fields of meaning, blurs. as if there were an animal lying there, dreaming, chewing its cud, breathing heavily. how can it be possible for this animal to eat itself without waking up, so that in the end only the dreaming, the chewing, the breathing remain.
Annette Schmucki

Biografie

Composers Slide Quartet

Composers Slide Quartet

The composers slide quartet was founded in 2004 with the aim of expanding the repertoire for trombone quartet with high-quality works of new music through close collaboration with contemporary composers and to perform them appropriately. The name of the ensemble was chosen in reference to the Composers String Quartet, which was founded in 1963 in the USA and was active until the 1990s.

The members of the composers slide quartetAndrew Digby, Patrick Crossland, Andreas Roth and Jan Termathplay a variety of low brass instruments. These freelance musicians play regularly with renowned international new music ensembles.

At first glance, a trombone quartet is a very homogeneous instrumentation. However, through the use of different instruments and many different mutes, it offers a diversely differentiated spectrum of sound colors. Through solo pieces in the programs, the compositional work of composers:inside can be illuminated more deeply.

The composers slide quartet has so far premiered new works by Annesley Black, Philipp Blume, Uwe Dierksen, Hans-Joachim Hespos (sextet), Robin Hoffmann, Tim Kienecker, Mesias Maiguashca, Cathy Milliken, Johannes Nied, Rolf Riehm, Uroš Rojko, Valerio Sannicandro, Johannes Schöllhorn, Cornelius Schwehr, Hannes Seidl, Anna Sowa, Günter Steinke, and Alistair Zaldua-most of them commissioned by CSQ. In collaboration with the Neue Vocalsolisten Stuttgart, the Schlagquartett Köln or the Ensemble Resonanz, the quartet was involved in world premieres by Bernhard Gander, Wolfgang Mitterer, Enno Poppe, Wolfgang Rihm, Martin Smolka and Gerhard Stäbler.

Recordings by SWR, WDR and DLF Kultur as well as recordings on CD document this work.

Biografie

Geneviève Strosser

Geneviève Strosser

After studying viola in the class of Claude Ducrocq in Strasbourg, Geneviève Strosser took lessons with Serge Collot and Jean Sulem at the Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique in Paris and attended master classes with Nobuko Imai, Bruno Giuranna Yuri Bashmet, Franco Donatoni and György Kurtág.
Regularly performs with new music ensembles such as Ensemble intercontemporain, London Sinfonietta, Klangforum Wien and Contrechamps under the direction of Pierre Boulez, Peter Eötvös and Heinz Holliger among others. Until 2000 she was a member of the Ensemble Modern. She also played in the Chamber Orchestra of Europe under the direction of Claudio Abbado, Nikolaus Harnoncourt, Carlo Maria Giulini, Sir Georg Solti.
With a repertoire of solo piecesincluding the great viola works of the 20th centuryGeneviève Strosser works closely with contemporary composers such as Peter Eötvös, Heinz Holliger, George Benjamin, Helmut Lachenmann. Stefano Gervasoni and Hugues Dufourt have dedicated viola concertos to her. She has premiered several works by Georges Aperghis and performed in his music theater pieces (Commentaires, Machinations, Un Temps Bis). In 2004 Geneviève Strosser was appointed professor at the Musikhochschule Basel. She plays on an instrument by Mathias Albani, built in 1660.