Jennifer Torrence

Jennifer Torrence

Ellen Ugelvik

Ellen Ugelvik

Laurence Crane

Laurence Crane

Laurence Crane (*1961 in Oxford, England) mostly composes for combinations of instruments and voices which are generally identified as ‘classical’, to which he often adds elements from outside that tradition.

 

A constant preoccupation has been the use of commonplace musical objects in new structural and formal relationships. Chords and intervals in their most basic state, arpeggios, drones, cadences, fragments of scales and short stepwise melodies are presented in regular and irregular repetitions or juxtapositions that are partly intuitive and partly structured according to a formal scheme. He invents a new context for these objects, to discover a fresh beauty in the familiar and the ordinary.

 

Crane writes music largely for the concert hall, though his output includes pieces initially composed for film, radio, theatre, dance and installation. Between 1985 and 2003 he concentrated almost exclusively on writing miniatures; short pieces that are invariably focussed on a single idea. Over the past two decades, he has developed an interest in making longer works and several compositions since 2003 are of more extended duration. These pieces explore the possibility of building a large-scale structure using the same type of static and reductive musical material that was examined in the miniatures.

animalia II

animalia II

Animalia II is an attempt to establish a small world of winged creatures on stage. The musical totality is comprised of their behavior and co-existence, through movement, mimetic interaction and sound signals.
Simon Løffler

Simon Løffler

Simon Løffler (*1981 in Copenhagen) studied in Copenhagen, Berlin, Aarhus and Brussels and lives in Copenhagen and Oslo. His current work is based on the exploration of the boundary between humans and animals. Previous work has focused on developing novel instrumental approaches and performativity in various forms.

CADENZA aus LASTER

CADENZA aus LASTER

CADENZA is a reflection on the historical setup of a cadenza. It is part of the piece LASTER for motorised piano and orchestra (2018).
Lisa Streich

Lisa Streich

Lisa Streich (*1985 in N. Råda, Sweden) works with motorised instruments of her own creation in her music. She is fascinated by the de-subjectivization of sound, which for her becomes in a way universal, speaking of and for everyone. She is also interested in the incongruent contrasts that can arise on both visual and auditory levels at the same time both in chamber and orchestral music. Likewise, she pursues a keen interest in imperfect, well-known intervals and chords from amateur choir recordings which she decidedly takes apart and weavessometimes with 40 voicesthroughout an orchestral movement. She is currently writing a catalogue BOOK OF CHORDS about those findings in her ”performing precarity” group at the NMH in Oslo.

http://www.lisastreich.se

2-Meter-Harmony: Uncertain Chorales

2-Meter-Harmony: Uncertain Chorales

This piece was co-commissioned by the Norwegian percussion trio Pinquins and the Performing Precarity project at the Norwegian Academy of Music. The first performance, by Pinquins at Ultima, Oslo, in September 2020, were part of a concert that was presented outdoors, and which used deliberately limited instrumental resources. These were two of the stipulations of the commission brief, that arose from the challenge of presenting live performances during the Covid-19 pandemic.

Another requirement was that the musicians should not be placed too close together. For most of the piece, all 3 performers work exactly in step, playing (or singing) single-timbre harmonies in rhythmic unison. They attempt to function as a single organism, but to a certain extent are undermined in this aim by the prevention of physical proximity. Potential instability is also generated by other factors; the external environmental conditions (in the case of outdoor performances), technology (performers have to enable sound file playback through bluetooth speakers) and the nature of some of the small instruments used, particularly the harmonicas.
Laurence Crane

Laurence Crane

Laurence Crane (*1961 in Oxford, England) mostly composes for combinations of instruments and voices which are generally identified as ‘classical’, to which he often adds elements from outside that tradition.

 

A constant preoccupation has been the use of commonplace musical objects in new structural and formal relationships. Chords and intervals in their most basic state, arpeggios, drones, cadences, fragments of scales and short stepwise melodies are presented in regular and irregular repetitions or juxtapositions that are partly intuitive and partly structured according to a formal scheme. He invents a new context for these objects, to discover a fresh beauty in the familiar and the ordinary.

 

Crane writes music largely for the concert hall, though his output includes pieces initially composed for film, radio, theatre, dance and installation. Between 1985 and 2003 he concentrated almost exclusively on writing miniatures; short pieces that are invariably focussed on a single idea. Over the past two decades, he has developed an interest in making longer works and several compositions since 2003 are of more extended duration. These pieces explore the possibility of building a large-scale structure using the same type of static and reductive musical material that was examined in the miniatures.

UTFLUKT

UTFLUKT

is a Norwegian expression that means taking an adventurous journey into an unexplored natural environment. The two performers enter a world of unknown creatures and sounds, a universe of unfamiliar colours, movements, textures and rhythms.

In UTFLUKT we explore how performers and the animation can develop a meaningful causal relationship and how sound production and performance might relate to each other in an eloquent and purposeful way together with the film.

This work was planned as a close collaboration between performers, an animated filmmaker and a composer. Due to the pandemic, all our work, with one exception, had to take place online. We found ways to live with this precarious situation, even though it wears you down. Neither the common work flow nor the blossoming in the lonely imagination could come about. The piece is carried by the enthusiasm of the partners.
Carola Bauckholt, Elizabeth Hobbs, Jennifer Torrence, Ellen Ugelvik

Carola Bauckholt

After working at the Theater am Marienplatz (TAM) Krefeld for several years, Carola Bauckholt (*1959 in Krefeld) studied composition at the Musikhochschule Köln with Mauricio Kagel (19781984). She founded the Thürmchen Verlag (music publisher) along with Caspar Johannes Walter in 1985, and six years later they founded the Thürmchen Ensemble.

 

In 2013, she was elected as a member of the Akademie der Künste in Berlin, from November 2021 on as the director of the music section. In 2015, she was appointed as professor of composition with focus on contemporary music theater at the Anton Bruckner Privatuniversität in Linz, Austria. In 2020, she was elected as a member of the North Rhine-Westphalian Academy of Sciences, Humanities and the Arts.

 

A central theme of Carola Bauckholt’s work is the examination of the phenomena of perception and understanding. Her compositions often blur the boundaries between visual arts, music theater and concert music. She is especially fond of using noisy sounds, which are often produced by unconventional means (such as extended instrumental techniques or bringing everyday objects to the concert hall). It is important to note that these noises are not just part of some kind of a predetermined compositional structure, but rather they are carefully studied and left free to unfold and develop at their own pace lending the compositions their own unique rhythm.

Elizabeth Hobbs

Elizabeth Hobbs is an animated filmmaker based in London. She has been making films for 22 years. Her films are experimental in form and always stretch the material possibilities of the medium by using unusual techniques and materials. These include ink on bathroom tile, typewriters, watercolour on paper, butterfly prints, rubber stamps and shoelaces. If there is a constant throughout her work, it’s her proclivity for retelling unusual stories from history.

Her films have travelled widely to international film festivals and won many awards including a BAFTA nomination for I’m OK in 2019. In 2019, Hobbs made The Flounder in collaboration with composer Carola Bauckholt. The Flounder was one of ten films commissioned by Klangforum Wien and Tricky Women/Tricky Realities for the project The Happiness Machine. Elizabeth enjoys sharing her practice through workshops and collaboration with The Creative Research Collective, NIE Theatre and artist Emily Tracy. She is an associate lecturer at University of The Arts, London.

 

About

Jennifer Torrence

Ellen Ugelvik

Performing Precarity I

5
03.02.
18:30
Theaterhaus, T3
Jennifer Torrence performance, drums, objects, motors, harmonica, pitch pipe, voice Ellen Ugelvik performance, piano, objects, harmonica, pitch pipe, voice Laurence Crane harmonica, pitch pipe, voice

Simon Løffler: animalia II

for 2 performers (2020)

Lisa Streich: CADENZA aus LASTER

for pianist and assistant (2018/19)

Laurence Crane: 2-Meter-Harmony: Uncertain Chorales

for 3 performers with harmonica, Pitch Pipe and voice (2020)

Carola Bauckholt, Elizabeth Hobbs, Jennifer Torrence, Ellen Ugelvik: UTFLUKT

for two performers and animation film (2021/22) ᵁᴬ

Performers of contemporary music today have to accept a strong fragmentation of their professional practice: The performer role today encompasses much more than the mastery of an instrument and the execution of a score. New instruments and technologies, new interactive methods of composition, interaction also with the audience, or new interdependencies between performers often make it impossible for performers to maintain their usual control over a performance.  Thus, performance becomes increasingly precarious.

 

In »Performing Precarity,« Ellen Ugelvik and Jennifer Torrence explore this new paradigm. What kinds of practices emerge when traditional notions of beauty and perfection are abandoned in favor of precarity, fragility, risk, instability, and failure?

 

In UTFLUKT, the musicians, along with the two authors, explore how performance and animation can enter into a meaningful causal relationship. Together they enter a world of unknown creatures and sounds, a universe of unknown colors, movements, textures and rhythms.

Performing Precarity I is supported by Norwegian Academy of Music (NMH) and Norwegian Directorate for Higher Education and Skills